ELC Award Gayle's design image

Finalists: Extending the Life of Clothes Design Award

12th March 2015

The SCAP ELC Award challenged designers to address the key reasons for garment failure and the concepts needed to achieve solutions to longer lasting clothes, as well as deliver ideas that are fashionable and saleable. 

Four finalists:
Rhiannon Hunt - winner
Valerie Goode - special commendation
Gayle Atkins
Nicholas Fellows

Rhiannon Hunt 

** Award winner 2015 ** 

From: Chelsea College of Art and Design (Graduated 2014)

 ELC Award Rhiannon's design image

Take a look at Rhiannon’s Designs

Take a look at Rhiannon’s Statement

 

Describe your submission in three words
Interactive Adaptable Creative

 

Why did you enter?
Sustainability always plays a significant role in my work as a designer so it seemed like the perfect opportunity to take on a new challenge, tackling textile waste and the notion of ‘fast fashion’

 

What inspires you?
My submission for the ELC Award was inspired by the art of origami, architecture and the built environment, but living in London I tend to find something new and inspiring everyday.

 

What do you see as the biggest challenge in sustainable fashion?
Changing people's perception of ‘sustainable fashion’ is one of the key challenges to seeing it become the norm. Many people have pre-conceived ideas about the look, feel and cost of sustainable clothing, but with technological advancements in materials science, the possibilities really are endless. 

 

Who would you like to see wearing your designs/collection?
Anyone and everyone. The more people wearing sustainable fashion built to last, the less the impact on the environment. 

 

What do you think you’ll be doing in 2020?
Developing creative solutions to sustainability issues.

Valerie Goode 

** Special commendation ** 

From: Kitty Ferreira Ltd

 ELC Award Valerie's design image

Take a look at Valerie’s Designs

Take a look at Valerie’s Statement

 

Describe your submission in three words
Sustainably Sophisticated Womenswear

 

Why did you enter?
The SCAP award would allow us to take all the research conducted for a training programme for disadvantaged youths to offer a made-to-measure service for city professional women and make it all happen. 

 

What inspires you?
My late grandmother is the real source of inspiration behind the brand, taking references from her naturally sustainable lifestyle, a lifestyle that my parents had brought with them when they emigrated to the UK. 

 

What do you see as the biggest challenge in sustainable fashion?
Trying to dispel the hippy connotations, sustainable fashion usually conjures and we do this by juxtaposing sustainable methods into city chic designs. We make sustainable fashion sophisticated and wearable across multiple purposes and most of all accessible.

 

Who would you like to see wearing your designs/collection?
From Sienna Miller to Baroness Valerie Amos, Emilie Sande to Michelle Obama.

 

What do you think you’ll be doing in 2020?
To have developed the training programme for young people into franchising opportunities by way of creating more UK jobs and allowing the young as well as older experienced pattern cutters and seamstresses to bridge the generation gap in skill shortages within the textile industry.

Gayle Atkins

From: Northbrook College Sussex / Marbella Design Academy

 ELC Award Gayle's design image

Take a look at Gayle’s Designs

Take a look at Gayle’s Statement

 

Describe your submission in three words
Simple Effective Design

 

Why did you enter?
I saw the competition and thought my design was perfect for the criteria. My project is based on the longevity of garments in an effort to prolong their life and encourage sustainability.

 

What inspires you?
I enjoy wandering around crumbling old cities and looking at the architecture. My colour scheme for the project was inspired by old derelict buildings and peeling paintwork in Cuba. I find beauty in old rather than new.

 

What do you see as the biggest challenge in sustainable fashion?
Encouraging a high volume of people to make small changes in the way they purchase and dispose of their clothes. People can make a difference just by choosing to buy locally or revive tired garments. 

 

Who would you like to see wearing your designs/collection?
Anyone who appreciates the clever twist of the dual purpose garment. It is designed to appeal to a wide cross-section but mainly young professionals. Alexa Chung would look cool in one! I like her vintage style.

 

What do you think you’ll be doing in 2020?
To have the brand stocked in established retail outlets such as Libertys and Anthropologie and grow my online business. I will continue my work in sustainable fashion education, encourageyoung people to design responsibly and look after the next generation. 

Nicholas Fellows

From: London College of Fashion

 ELC Award Nicholas' design image

Take a look at Nicholas’ Designs

Take a look at Nicholas’ Statement

 

Describe your submission in three words
Dissolving size restrictions 

 

Why did you enter?
I entered because I had an ambitious idea which I believed could be not only a viable business but a great improvement to sustainability in the Childrenswear Fashion industry.

 

What inspires you?
I find inspiration in science, history and art. I am fascinated by problem solving , stories and creativity. I'm not afraid to make continuous mistakes until failed attempts develop into real inspiration. 

 

What do you see as the biggest challenge in sustainable fashion?
The biggest challenge is to step away from making sustainable fashion an option and create sustainable fashion that is essential. Sustainable fashion is seen as an unfashionable concept. 

 

Who would you like to see wearing your designs/collection?
My designs are for children to love and live in, for much longer then they could in other clothing . I would like to narrow the gender stereotypes in children's wear design to encourage "nonconformity" at a young age.

 

What do you think you’ll be doing in 2020?
By 2020 I would like to have my designs in stores and ready to transform the way we view the lifespan of clothes. 

We are delighted to announce that the winner is …

 Rhiannon Hunt

 

With a special commendation prize going to …

Valerie Goode

 

 

All entries were of an exceptional standard and the judges said it a tough decision.

 

Read the press release

The Award 

The SCAP Extending the Life of Clothes Design Award was open to final year fashion and textile design undergraduates, MA students and professional fashion and textile designers from industry that live, work or study in England.

  • Submissions were assessed by an expert panel of industry professionals and academics.
  • A prize of £5,000 is available to the winner, as well as an opportunity to develop their ideas to progress their work and develop it for a commercial market.

In the Board room – finalist interviews

The finalists interviews:

The finalists were asked to present on the following aspects of their entries:

Innovation: What journey did you take to arrive at your final design?

Environmental: What benefits does your design bring to reducing the carbon, water and waste footprint of the product?

Ingenuity: Is your design magical? Have you found a unique solution to a problem people are currently facing?

Development and Commercial Potential: Is your design sound? Do you have a viable business model?

Why it all started

The SCAP ELC Award is delivered by WRAP, the organisation behind the Sustainable Clothing Action Plan (SCAP) and Love Your Clothes, with support from Defra, British Fashion Council, The Knowledge Transfer Network, InnovateUK, Sustainable Angle, ModeConnect and Ethical Fashion Forum.

The Award was created because WRAP research demonstrates that the biggest opportunity to tackle the environmental impacts of clothing is by targeting active life – extending a product’s active life by just nine months could reduce the carbon, water and waste footprints by 20-30% each, and save around £5 billion worth of the resources used to supply, launder and dispose of clothing**.

‘Extending the life of clothes’ is a key focus for the sector commitment, SCAP 2020, with many retailers, brands, charities and textile reprocessors signed up to it; all aiming to reduce the environmental impacts of clothes